HYPERFOCUSED NARRATIVES


When they are abstracted, world-reflections tend to become self-reflections. To be more particular; while viewing abstract artworks, the regions of spectacular interest could be perceived by the Eye to become radically equalist in the contextual frames the works speak for; where abstractions are alluring representations of overarching structures – or perhaps the underlying foundations for what could have formerly been very real, painful, humorous, dark or light. Yet, to dictate the terms of how the subject’s gaze is constructed, and how the association to the artwork propagates is against some of the very core beliefs and values behind these works; and, Égalité is never achieved through dictatorship.

The time-based, procedural abstractions on metallic plates utilize a variety of techniques commonly attributed to filmmaking and VFX production in a hyper-focused manner and in verisimilitude with long-exposure photography techniques for later stages of printing.

The core idea for the series is based on media reflexivity, in a theoretical context which observes the media-event as a happening. The footage and the photographs are treated as found-objects - objet trouvé - to create abstractions in discursive allegory. In their use of materials to compliment the reductive mannerism, they draw inspiration from the upcycling movements around the globe which tackle global warming, environmental collapse and climate change issues to explore sustainable materialistic solutions; the series intend to invoke different discussions on subjectivity in media spectatorship and transmutations in aesthetics. 

These works are abstractions of digital content which depict several different types of media events, with a number of them being dedicated to graphical studies; video, film, photography, social media timelines which are radically ripped apart from their original senses of meanings. The symbolic signification processes are immediately interrupted by an Uncanny intervention, a traumatic radicalization, a reversal of the traditionally linear media production workflows and an aesthetic entertainment objective to ask one question in particular: “Are new narratives made possible?” 




The Digital Rule II, 2019, 200 x 100 cm,
procedural painting and print on metal, Sevil Dolmacı Art Gallery.




The Dandelion, 2020, 100 x 100 cm,
procedural painting and print on metal, Sevil Dolmacı Art Gallery.




Kill Your Darlings, 2019, 100 x 100 cm,
procedural painting and print on aluminium, Sevil Dolmacı Art Gallery.




The Digital Rule I, 2019, 200 x 100 cm,
procedural painting and print on metal, Sevil Dolmacı Art Gallery.


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